O U T S I D E L E F T   stay i n d e p e n d e n t

300 Words From London: Blek Le Rat Comes To Town

Legendary street stencil artist and graffiti pioneer Blek Le Rat hits East London.

get the weekly Outsideleft newsletter
by Lake, Editor, London for outsideleft.com
originally published: October, 2006
who could begrudge an artist for looking beyond the ephemeral
by Lake, Editor, London for outsideleft.com
originally published: October, 2006
who could begrudge an artist for looking beyond the ephemeral

There seems to be as many art galleries in Shoreditch as there are fried chicken shops around where I'm living. It's like the glory days of gallery hopping in the Cork Street area on a Thursday night - so easy to cop some free drinks and engage in some easy going art banter as you move from one place to the next.

Blek Le Rat had his first solo gallery exhibition in Europe at the Leonard Street Gallery.

Blek is a Parisian artist who is now well into his 50s. It has been suggested that he is the founding father of the stencil graffiti movement. I don't know about that but he has certainly been putting up his art on the streets of the world since the early 1980s.

It was great to see his iconic sheep and beggar figures pasted up life-size on the street as I walked to the gallery and I particularly like the empty ornate picture frames that he'd pasted up on the thickly tagged brickwork of a nearby building; The holes in the frame revealing the scrawl underneath and suggesting that everything on the streets could be worth another look.

There's a problem though, when street art is brought into the gallery space. Work made for streets needs to be adapted to fit in the confines of a conventional art space. A full size hands-outstretched pasted paper beggar says something different than the same image reduced to fit on a small square canvas.

Other artists have tackled this by taking over the entire space and covering gallery walls in the same way they might in the street so that they becomes just an extension of their work outside. By hanging regular canvas in a traditional format this show somehow blunted Blek's work. Though I loved the images they seemed trapped and subdued by their surroundings.

In the basement there was a slideshow of his street work from the last 30 years - all random rats, leaping Tom Waits, Princess Di meets Napoleon. It looked great and the show really needed some of the dynamism and energy evident in these earlier works.

I am told that almost all of Blek's London street work was torn down within a day by zealous council workers. The gallery show runs on until mid November. Maybe that's its point. The images trapped on paper and canvas for as long as there is somebody prepared to care for them instead of being destroyed on a whim. And who could begrudge an artist for looking beyond the ephemeral.

More on Blek right here http://bleklerat.free.fr/

see more stories from outsideleft's Culture archive »»

Lake
Editor, London

the first journalism Lake ever had published was a history of Johnny Thunders for Record Collector magazine, since then he has written for publications including the Guardian, Dazed and Confused, the Idler and more recently, outsideleft.com as you have just seen.

more stories you really could read...


thumb through the ancient archives:

search for something you might like...


sign up for the outsideleft weekly. a selection of new and archived stories every week. Or less.

View previous campaigns.

If You Like Looking at Pots
There's a lot to like at SOFA NY
That is Transvision
Arts group The Smartest Project's Haitian Art pop up gallery show, Transvision, is a Voyage into The Visionary World of Haitian Art
Tramps Like Us, Baby We Were Born to Do Drugs
Just when you thought there were no more songs about drugs to be written, The Hold Steady load a fresh syringe with it.
Making it Happen Again
Hawkins rising in the West! Paul Hawkins barely has time to check in to Los Angeles before appraising the career-fest overview of situationalist happener Allan Kaprow at MOCA
Step Away From The White Album, Sir
Bob Frank & John Murry's World Without End (Part 2)
It might seem like The Bob Frank and John Murry's Interview without end, but the end is here. At the end of Part 2...
Some of our favorite things...